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Archive → March, 2015

Baoshan Gaoligongshan Nature Reserve Ecotourism and Project Site Report

Yiluo Meeting

Team members gather for an obligatory group photograph. Taken at the entrance to the impressive Wenchanggong Temple in the village of Yiluo in Tengchong County. A Daoist temple devoted to scholarship, literature, culture and civilisation. The perfect venue for us to summarise our observations and think about the future.

ChinaWatch2050’s first blogpost for 2015. Better late than never. I hope this year to bring you more interesting insights into China from my perspective. The first cab off the rank is formally releasing the report on last year’s (November 2014) ecotourism excursion and project site inspection on the Gaoligong Mountain Nature Reserve (Baoshan). The report was compiled by Dr Ed Jocelyn and can be found in pdf form here. Ed and I have been to this site before and I’ve summarised those trips here and here.

Special thanks to Frank Hitman of Zouba Travel for providing logistical support and boundless enthusiasm.

Special thanks to Frank Hitman and Matthew Hartzell (pictured below) of Zouba Tours for providing logistical support and boundless enthusiasm.

I would like to thank the sponsors and supporters of this project: The Faculty of Arts at The University of Western Australia; Zouba Tours; Red Rock Treks; Beijing Hikers; Osprey Packs (China); and The Tea Exchange. The local Baoshan Government, especially the Cultural Affairs Bureau and Baoshan Museum, were very supportive.

Wherever outdoor types gather you can be sure that someone has a map and someone else has a headlamp. Pictured here Matthew Hartzell (many thanks for your support) and Yang Xiao (who has appeared previously on this site).

Wherever outdoor types gather you can be sure that someone has a map and someone else has a headlamp. Pictured here Matthew Hartzell and Yang Xiao (who has appeared previously on this site).

I will bring you more news about our project plans and events in the coming weeks and months. As Ed’s report suggests, the growth of outdoor tourism in China is booming. Unfortunately the resources and abilities of local communities to deal with the dramatic increase of ecotourists and hikers is limited. We hope to do our bit to alleviate the deleterious effects of China’s ‘return to nature’.

One of the highlights for me was taking time to enjoy a good brew of quality Chinese black tea at 3,200 metres.

One of the highlights for me was taking time to enjoy a good brew of quality Chinese black tea at 3,200 metres.